ZIALE Explains Poor Lawyer’s Pass Rate

mulembe-zialeZambia Institute of Advanced Legal Education (ZIALE) director Enock Mulembe says the poor pass rate at the institution is because of the poor quality of students from various law schools.

Mulembe told a parliamentary committee on legal affairs that the quality of students exiting from various law schools are failing to meet the pressure of ZIALE.

He also said that ZIALE is in the process of restructuring its curricular in order to meet modern demands of the profession.

And Law Association of Zambia (LAZ) president James Banda said the organization is aware of some concerns on the operation of ZIALE and that they are trying to resolve some of the issues.

Banda also refuted assertions that there is a curtail within the legal profession that is regulating the influx of lawyers on the market by using the law pass rate at ZIALE.

He said LAZ is merely trying to have qualified lawyers to be practicing law.

Some LAZ representatives said that after considering the quality of students graduating from law schools, most of them are not fully baked.

2 Comments

  1. Jackson C Musamba
    Posted January 23, 2013 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

    Please attend to this crisis with the urgency it deserves!

  2. Mphangwe
    Posted January 23, 2013 at 3:35 pm | Permalink

    The reported low pass rate at ZIALE stems from the low teaching standards provided by the School of Law at UNZA. The combined force of Unza’s School of Law, the Senate and the ultimately UNZA Council as the employer, must tighten the screws of recruitment procedures to ensure highly qualified personnel are recruited as academics in the School of Law.

    A cross-pollination of academics trained both locally and also from abroad, such as Australia, Canada, USA and UK universities will enrich the quality of trained lawyers in Zambia.

    Persons that are well grounded in the fine arts of Law, cannot easily fall prey to the machinations of political interferences in the administration of the Judiciary in Zambia. The likes of the Kabimbas, Nchitos, Sangwas, Mumba Malilas, Matibinis, Musa Mwenyes, Mmembes, constitute a mass of legal garbage best classified as fossils in the dynamics of modern legal systems.